me, peroxide

Scotland Street

Opened: 31st August, 1842.
Closed to passengers: 22nd May, 1868.


Trains approaching Scotland Street Station from Leith and Granton passed beneath Rodney Street through this tunnel, seen in June 1993. The tunnel has recently been reopened as a cyclepath. [Nigel Welbourn]

Collapse )
me, peroxide

Trinity

Opened as Newhaven: 31st August, 1842.
Closed: 2nd November, 1925.

The second Newhaven Station was a truly delightful building in smooth grey stone, wholly in harmony with its views of the Firth of Forth, hilly Inchkeith and the distant Fife hills which often present grey hues themselves. A solid two-storey facade with simple square windows and continuous roofline faced the steep approach from trinity Crescent, whilst the single-storey platform elevation incorporated twin gables featuring bay windows enlivened by decorative hoods. In the summer of 1914, the station had 12 trains each way between Granton and Edinburgh Waverley, and was very popular with Newhaven fishwives travelling to the city. With a short, sharp, 1-in-100 climb from the shoreline, Waverley-bound trains approached the platforms in lively fashion.


By 7th April, 1958, when this photograph was taken, the former Trinity Station was occupied by a private dwelling. The original Newhaven terminus was off to the left, approached past the retaining wall below York Road in the distance. Latterly used for goods traffic, it closed to all traffic on 2nd November, 1925. [W.A.C. Smith]

Collapse )
me, peroxide

North Leith

Opened: 10th May, 1846.
Closed to passengers: 16th June, 1947.
Renamed Leith Citadel: May 1952.
Closed to goods: 5th February,1968.

The Edinburgh, Leith & Granton Railway's station at North Leith was approached by a sharp curve and, for what became an important suburban terminus, had an extremely constricted layout. A very short overall roof provided at modicum of cover at the platform ends, but trains of modest length still stood out in the open even when drawn right up to the buffer stops. Sentinel steam railcars, introduced by the LNER in 1929, barely managed to shelter beneath it either. Despite its inadequate interior, the station presented an intriguing facade to Commercial Street. The single-storey, grey stone building was slightly angled at the corner of Citadel Street, thus turning the entrance towards the centre of Leith, albeit somewhat shyly. Classical details were employed, including round columns with highly decorative capitals flanking the main doorway, with more subdued square columns on the projecting section at the opposite end of the building. There was a prominent cornice and the entrance was emphasised by a pair of towers capped by urns. In 1914, North Leith had 26 weekday departures for Waverley, reducing to 11 in 1930 and to a fairly useless 6 departures by the time of its closure. Fortunately, this historic building survives today, and is now occupied by an activities centre run by the Citadel Youth Project.

Wikipedia page.


Ex-LNER Class V3 2-6-2T No. 67624 waits at North Leith Station as fish vans are loaded from a flat-bed lorry on 25th June, 1957, almost exactly ten years after passenger services from the station had been withdrawn. The grey stone bonded warehouse on the far side of Commercial Street still exists but has now been converted into flats, and the legend 'MacDonald & Muir Highland Queen Whisky' has been removed. [J.P. Wilson]

Collapse )
me, peroxide

Bonnington

Opened: 10th May, 1846.
Closed to passengers: 16th June, 1947.
Closed to goods: 22nd July, 1968.

Bonnington Station was situated below Newhaven Road, and offered passenger facilities midway along the North Leith Branch from its opening. The station building was a plain structure, with harsh walls of irregular grey sandstone, relieved by windows and doorways completely devoid of decoration. Moderately long platforms were provided, but tight clearances below the overbridge were dangerous for the unwary. At first, the two-storey station building stood proud above the cutting, but four-stoey tenements on Newhaven Road soon dwarfed it. Today, the former station building is occupied by houses numbered 92 & 94, Newhaven Road, and it still looks out-of-place amidst its taller neighbours.


A westward view at the closed Bonnington Station on 15th October, 1960, shortly after the line to North Leith had been singled. Bonnington Goods Yard closed on 22nd July, 1968, and the trackbed here is now occupied by a cyclepath, but the platforms remain. [W.A.C. Smith]
me, peroxide

Easter Road


An eastward view from the site of Easter Road Junction towards the former Lochend South Junction on a snowy day in March 2000. In the distance can be seen the bridge which formerly carried the line from London Road Junction to Leith Central Station over what is now the Powderhall Branch. [Michael Laing]

Collapse )
me, peroxide

Warriston Viaduct


North-eastward view along Warriston Road, Canonmills, Edinburgh, towards the viaduct which carried the Edinburgh, Leith & Granton Railway over the road and the Water of Leith, 13th July, 1999. The railway opened on 31st August, 1842, and trains from Edinburgh to Leith or Granton passed over the viaduct from right to left. This section closed to passenger traffic as long ago as 22nd March, 1868, when it was bypassed by a new route from Edinburgh Waverley to Warriston via Easter Road and Leith Walk; however, it continued to be used for traffic to Scotland Street Goods Yard until 6th November, 1967. Today, the viaduct forms part of Edinburgh's system of cycle-paths. [Michael Laing]

Collapse )
me, peroxide

Granton Harbour

Eventually, Granton Harbour had a pier 1,700ft. long by 180ft. wide with ten jetties, two low-water slipways, eleven warehouses and sixteen cranes. Great breakwaters to the east and west enclosed 130 acres of water, whilst iron foundries, bonded warehouses, a ship-building complex and a vast timber yard developed on the shoreline. The Edinburgh, Leith and Granton Railway approached from the east and had a network of sidings in the harbour complex, while the Caledonian Railway approached from the west, and a connecting line between the rival systems crossed Granton Square.


Granton Station and ferry berth stood on the middle pier of Granton Harbour, though hidden from view in this photo by the corner of the Customs & Excise building in this photo which was taken on 3rd September, 1955. The harbour's western breakwater is in the background with a collier berthed alongside it, and a row of rail-mounted cranes silhouetted against the misty Firth of Forth and Fife's hilly coastline. Granton Square was once the terminus of seven tram routes, and domed-roof Edinburgh Standard Car No. 226 waits to leave on Route No. 14. One of Edinburgh Corporation's strange open rear-platform Leyland single-deckers and a taxi firm in the corner of the square completed the public transport miscellany. Much of the western harbour basin has now been infilled and is occupied by commercial premises, while the eastern part of the harbour is now a pleasure marina. [W.A.C. Smith]

Collapse )